God of Abundance, Provision, Plenty (Genesis 13)

biryanni dish on round stainless steel tray

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Based on Genesis 13
Abraham and Lot end their conflict peaceably
God’s generous promise to Abraham of land and children

You are the God of Abundance
God of Provision and Plenty
Generous Creator and Sustainer

Yet
So many do not have enough
So many are burdened by too much
So many squander what they have
So many do evil to get more
Corruption, Injustice, Oppression, Greed, Graft, Violence…
Fear-filled Competition

Lord, have mercy

Help me choose You and your ways
Gratitude for all you entrust to me
Collaboration over competition
True love of those I’m working with
Eyes to see all people as you see them… beloved

Forgive and heal my fears when there doesn’t seem to be enough
You know my worry and lack of faith

God of Abundance
I trust you to provide everything I need
and everything others need
Increase my faith and trust
Help me approach every need and conflict
with fairness, generosity, openness
Help me see all you are providing
Help me hear and listen to all you are saying
Your ways, always. Amen

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God of Abundance, Provision, Plenty © 2019 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
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Jesus, the Coming Messiah- Deliverer of the Afflicted (Psalm 72, Luke 4)

Jesus, The Coming MessiahJesus, The Coming Messiah: Advent Readings from Old Testament to New
December 10: The Messiah as Deliverer of the Afflicted
Readings: Psalm 72; Luke 4:17-19

Psalm 72:12-14, The Voice
For he will rescue the needy when they ask for help!
He will save the burdened and come to the aid of those who have no other help.
He offers compassion to the weak and the poor;
He will help and protect the lives of the needy!
He will liberate them from the fierce sting of persecution and violence;
in his eyes, their blood is precious.

Luke 4:17-19, The Voice
The synagogue attendant gave Him the scroll of the prophet Isaiah, and Jesus unrolled it to the place where Isaiah had written these words:

The Spirit of the Lord the Eternal One is on Me.
Why? Because the Eternal designated Me
to be His representative to the poor, to preach good news to them.
He sent Me to tell those who are held captive that they can now be set free,
and to tell the blind that they can now see.
He sent Me to liberate those held down by oppression.
In short, the Spirit is upon Me to proclaim that now is the time;
this is the jubilee season of the Eternal One’s grace

Prayer
Hallelujah to Jesus!
Defender of the weak and poor
You provide, you protect, you liberate

Hallelujah to Jesus!
Our Compassionate King
You offer your own body and blood
For all life, every life, is precious

Hallelujah to Jesus!
Bringer of Change and Justice
Finish your good and generous work

Have mercy, Lord of Hope
Draw near
Make us new

Release us from
the chains of this moment, born of imprisoned years
the blindness to our complicity, frailty, and poverty
the distractions and false calls of those who cannot help
the apathy keeping us from seeing, speaking, and caring
the weight of our needs stealing our courage to try
the slowness of change chipping away at our enduring

Have mercy, Lord of Hope
Draw near
Make us new

Chorus of Give Me Your Eyes by Brandon Heath
Give me your eyes for just one second
Give me your eyes so I can see
Everything that I keep missing
Give me your love for humanity
Give me your arms for the broken hearted
The ones that are far beyond my reach
Give me you heart for the ones forgotten
Give me your eyes so I can see

Quote from The Talmud
Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief.
Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now.
You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.

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Thank you for setting aside times this Holy Season to seek the One we celebrate.

Jesus, The Coming Messiah is an Advent Bible Reading Plan highlighting the Old Testament prophesies and passages which Christians see fulfilled in Jesus.

As you read each passage, consider how this description of Jesus the Messiah reveals his character, motivation, and purpose. How does this description inspire you to trust Jesus and his promises? How will you apply and share what you have discovered? I look forward to your comments.

If you’re in Sarasota, please drop by Trinity United Methodist Church for one of our seasonal events or services or just to say, “Hi.” You’re always welcome and wanted.

Happy Advent and Merry Christmas! – Lisa <

The Messiah as Deliverer of the Afflicted © 2017 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
You are welcome to use this work in devotional settings with proper attribution.
Please leave a comment for information/permission to publish this work in any form.

We Stand in Awe, a prayer of praise based on Luke 7.11-17

Christ Raising the Dead by Louisa Anne, Marchioness of Waterford 1818-1891

Christ Raising the Dead Louisa Anne, Marchioness of Waterford 1818-1891 Bequeathed by Adelaide, Lady Brownlow 1917 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N03222

Based on Luke 7:11-17, Jesus raises the widow’s son

Jesus, we stand in awe before your mighty power
You defeat the grave
You are victorious over death
Raise us from our funeral beds
Raise us to life
Your word awakening us
Your Divine breath once more in our lungs

Jesus, we stand in awe before your great compassion
You defeat our isolation
You are victorious over our poverty
Raise us from our mourning
Raise us to life
Your word transforming us
Your daily bread once more in our mouths

Hallelujah to Jesus, our Savior and Lord!
Hallelujah to your mercy, to your favor, to your presence!
You meet us where we are
and meet our most desperate need!
Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Amen!

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We Stand in Awe © 2017 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
You are welcome to use this work in a worship setting with proper attribution.
Leave a comment for information and permission to publish this work in any form.

Prayer from Visions of a World Hungry by Thomas G. Pettepiece

Indian street seller hands displaying green chickpeas. Photo by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons

Indian street seller hands displaying green chickpeas. Photo by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons

Prayer from Visions of a World Hungry by Thomas G. Pettepiece
Lord, I already know the best way to alter my life-style to the best advantage for all — live like Jesus. The Christian existence ideally is to imitate what you do. You send the sun and rain on everyone, you want me to bet back to the basic facts of life, to love without reservation, to distinguish between life’s needs and life itself, and seek first your kingdom knowing you will meet all my other needs.

Still it is easy to trust in the “things” of today and feel like it is up to me to see that humanity survives. Keep me from undue worry and pride. Remind me that life is a gift — not a right, and that my attitude toward the ultimate resources and values in life will determine how the earth’s resources will be handled and provided for those who need them. I have already formed many habits of consuming and acting. Guide me in aligning my personal priorities to conform to my awareness of a world hungry. May my life-style become more compatible with our biosphere and supportive of peoples around the world.

Lord, help me choose a simpler life-style that promotes solidarity with the world’s poor, helps me appreciate nature more, affords greater opportunity to work together with my neighbors, reduces my use of limited resources, creates greater inner harmony, saves money, allows time for mediation and prayer, incites me to take political and social action.

May all my decisions about my style of life celebrate the joy of life that comes from loving you. Amen

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Visions of a World Hungry by Thomas G. Pettepiece. (The Upper Room, 1979)

#LukeActs2014: Come Sup With God (Luke 14)

World Communion Altar Table, photo by Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia

World Communion Altar Table, photo by Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia

Luke 14:12-14 NIV
Then Jesus said to his host, “When you give a luncheon or dinner, do not invite your friends, your brothers or relatives, or your rich neighbors; if you do, they may invite you back and so you will be repaid. But when you give a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind, and you will be blessed. Although they cannot repay you, you will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous.”

In the story of the feeding of the 5,000 we see Jesus once again addressing the most essential, physical needs of his fellow human beings – hunger, thirst, companionship – and once again, breaking down every socially-constructed barrier that keeps us from eating with one another. He did the same thing when, much to the chagrin of the religious leaders, he dined with tax collectors and prostitutes and told his more well-to-do hosts that “when you give a banquet, invite the crippled, the lame, the blind, and you will be blessed.” The English word companion, is derived from the Latin com (“with”) and panis (“bread”). A companion, therefore, is someone with whom you share your bread. – Rachel Held Evans, 5000 Companions

Luke 14:15-24 NRSV
One of the dinner guests, on hearing this, said to him, “Blessed is anyone who will eat bread in the kingdom of God!” Then Jesus said to him, “Someone gave a great dinner and invited many. At the time for the dinner he sent his slave to say to those who had been invited, “Come; for everything is ready now.’ But they all alike began to make excuses. The first said to him, “I have bought a piece of land, and I must go out and see it; please accept my regrets.’ Another said, “I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I am going to try them out; please accept my regrets.’ Another said, “I have just been married, and therefore I cannot come.’ So the slave returned and reported this to his master. Then the owner of the house became angry and said to his slave, “Go out at once into the streets and lanes of the town and bring in the poor, the crippled, the blind, and the lame.’ And the slave said, “Sir, what you ordered has been done, and there is still room.’ Then the master said to the slave, “Go out into the roads and lanes, and compel people to come in, so that my house may be filled. For I tell you, none of those who were invited will taste my dinner.’ ”

Sadly, the way we as Christians have historically responded to the gift of the Eucharist is to make sure that we understand it, then to make sure we put boundaries around it and then to make sure we enforce both the correct understanding and the correct boundaries. But on the night Jesus was betrayed he didn’t say “this is my body broken for you…UNDERSTAND this in remembrance of me….he didn’t say ACCEPT this or DEFEND this or BOUNDARY this in remembrance of me he just said do this in remembrance of me. – Nadia Bolz Weber, “This teaching is HARD, who can accept it” – a sermon on the Eucharist

The table is rich-laden; feast royally, all of you! The calf is fattened; let no one go forth hungry! Let all partake of the Feast of Faith. Let all receive the riches of goodness. Let none lament their poverty, for the Universal Kingdom has been revealed.
– John Chrysostom

Come Sup With God
by Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
Meter 88.88 (LM)
Suggested tunes:
HURSLEY (United Methodist Hymnal #339) or
GIFT OF LOVE (United Methodist Hymnal #408)

Come sup with God all you who thirst
All you who hunger be the first
Feast on Christ’s Body and his Blood
O taste and see this meal of Love

Come children, elders, blind, and spent
Come foolish, able, indigent
Confess, repent, and then receive
Forgiveness flows abundantly

Come often, friend, for here is grace
made manifest in time and place
Christ’s mercy floods our brokenness
with healing balm and righteousness

Come to be changed. Come to be fed.
Come savor Christ, the Life, the Bread.
Drink deep the gift of healing poured
and leave a vessel of our Lord.

Sing Praise to Christ our Host and meal
Whose saving work provides the seal
for us once bound, now freed from death
to live for Christ with every breath

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Come Sup with God © 2000 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
You are welcome to use this work in a worship setting with proper attribution.
Please contact Lisa for information and permission to publish this work in any form.

Advent Photo-A-Day: Day 13, Justice

Micah 6:8 by Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia.

Micah 6:8 by Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia.

The thought behind the photo:
SCRIPTURE: Micah 6:8 NRSV
He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?

Do justice and love kindness and walk humbly with your God
It’s all about the “and”. – Lisa Degrenia <><

Do not be daunted by the enormity of the world’s grief.
Do justly, now. Love mercy, now. Walk humbly, now.
You are not obligated to complete the work, but neither are you free to abandon it.
-The Talmud

Encourage by Steve Garnaas Holmes
The blind receive their sight, the lame walk,
the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised,
and the poor have good news brought to them. – Matthew 11.5

Strengthen the weak hands, and make firm the feeble knees.
Say to those who are of a fearful heart,
“Be strong, do not fear! Here is your God.
The Holy One is coming in triumph, with unassailable justice.
– Isaiah 35.3-4

Isaiah promises a world in which “sorrow and sighing will flee away.” For those who know grief or despair, who suffer oppression or abuse, who face injustice or violence— dare they hope for such a day? And if they do, what could give them that hope?

Maybe it will be you. You be the one. God has sent you, a messenger, to prepare a way. Every choice you make, ask yourself, does this give hope or make life better for the powerless? Live your life in such a way that each moment is an act of encouragement for the poor and outcast, for those who wait. In all that you do, be a light in their darkness. God’s grace is in you to do this.

The December 13, 2013 devotion from http://umrethinkchurch.tumblr.com 
SCRIPTURE: Psalm 72:1-5 NRSV
Give the king your justice, O God, and your righteousness to a king’s son. May he judge your people with righteousness, and your poor with justice. May the mountains yield prosperity for the people, and the hills, in righteousness. May he defend the cause of the poor of the people, give deliverance to the needy, and crush the oppressor. May he live while the sun endures, and as long as the moon, throughout all generations.

It’s been said that if you want to judge the effectiveness of a leader, or the values of a society, look at how they “defend the cause of the poor” or “give deliverance to the needy” [verse 4].

What characteristics do you desire in a good leader? Are these the characteristics you may also find in yourself?

Verse 18 goes on to say, “Blessed be the LORD, the God of Israel, who alone does wondrous things.” But we each are called to participate in these wondrous things. What it looks like for each of us varies.

“Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love,” Mother Theresa once wrote. What are those things you are called to do with great love so that justice, righteousness and peace might reign?

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Thank you Rethink Church for a great way to make preparing for Christmas more meaningful. Join me and thousands more in setting aside time to reflect, focus, and literally picture the deep themes of Jesus’ birth.

Click here for more information on Advent Photo-A-Day from Rethink Church.

Click here for a master list of links to my submissions. Lisa <><

Prayer: Equity for Workers

Garments Factory in Bangladesh, photo by Fahad Faisal via Wikimedia Commons

Garments Factory in Bangladesh, photo by Fahad Faisal via Wikimedia Commons

This prayer comes in the light of the Bangladesh garment factory building collapse.

James 5:1-5 CEB
Pay attention, you wealthy people! Weep and moan over the miseries coming upon you. Your riches have rotted. Moths have destroyed your clothes. Your gold and silver have rusted, and their rust will be evidence against you. It will eat your flesh like fire. Consider the treasure you have hoarded in the last days. Listen! Hear the cries of the wages of your field hands. These are the wages you stole from those who harvested your fields. The cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of heavenly forces. You have lived a self-satisfying life on this earth, a life of luxury. You have stuffed your hearts in preparation for the day of slaughter.

Mighty One
In your justice
In your mercy
bring equity to workers across your world
break the rod of oppressive business practices
free us from our addiction to low cost goods
raise up those who work in danger and discrimination
those who toil in the dirt, heat, and filth
those who care for the vulnerable
those who put clothes on our backs
food on our tables
roofs over our heads

Carpenter of Nazareth
You hear their cries and so do we
Fill us with courage and conviction
Make us instruments of your peace
your justice
your mercy
Amen

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Click here for a worship resource entitled Prayer for Labor Day

Prayer: Equity for Workers © 2013 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia.
You are welcome to use this work in a worship setting with proper attribution.
Please contact Lisa for information and permission to publish this work in any form.

For more information on the art, scripture translation and the use of this post in other settings, please refer to the copyright information page.