Discovering Jesus- a Bible Reading Plan for Beginners

bible hold handsA friend of mine works in the mental health wing of a hospital. Many persons with little to no spiritual background begin exploring faith while they’re there for treatment. They’re interested in knowing more about Jesus and in reading the Bible, but don’t know where to begin.

She asked for a simple Bible reading plan to get them started. Here’s what God and I came up with: Discovering Jesus- a Bible Reading Plan for Beginners.

I hope it’s helpful for you. I’d love to hear how you’re using it. – Lisa <><

  • 30 Bible Readings
  • 6 readings per week for 5 weeks
    • Week 1- Jesus’ birth through the calling of the first disciples
    • Week 2- a sampling of Jesus’ ministry
    • Week 3- a sampling of Jesus’ parables
    • Week 4- Holy Week, Jesus entering Jerusalem through his death on the cross
    • Week 5- Jesus’ resurrection through his ascension
  • Reminders for Sunday worship and rest

CLICK HERE for a PDF of the reading plan suitable for printing

Day Events in the Life of Jesus Christ Scripture
Sun Worship and Rest
Mon Birth and Infancy of Jesus Luke 2:1-38
Tues Jesus, a Child at the Temple Luke 2:41-52
Wed Jesus’ Baptism Matthew 3:13-17
Thur Jesus is Tempted and Rejected Luke 4:1-30
Fri Jesus’ First Followers- The Fishermen Luke 5:1-11
Sat Jesus’ First Followers- The Tax Collector Matthew 9:9-13
Sun Worship and Rest
Mon Jesus Heals Mark 5
Tues Jesus Teaches (The Sermon on the Mount) Matthew 5-7
Wed Jesus Performs Miracles Matthew 14:13-33
Thur Jesus and Nicodemus John 3:1-21
Fri Jesus, The Good Shepherd John 10
Sat Jesus Raises Lazarus John 11
Sun Worship and Rest
Mon The Use of Parables Mark 4:1-34
Tues Parable: The Good Samaritan Luke 10:25-37
Wed Parables: Humility and Hospitality Luke 14:1-24
Thur Parables: Lost and Found Luke 15
Fri Parables on Prayer Luke 18:1-14
Sat Parables: Faith in Action Matthew 25
Sun Worship and Rest
Mon Jesus Enters Jerusalem (Palm Sunday) Luke 19:28-48
Tues The Last Supper (Holy Thursday) Matthew 26:17-35
Wed Jesus Washes the Disciples’ Feet John 13:1-35
Thur The Vine and the Branches John 15
Fri Jesus Prays and is Arrested Luke 22:39-23:25
Sat The Crucifixion of Jesus (Good Friday) Luke 23:26-56
Sun Worship and Rest
Mon The Resurrection of Jesus (Easter Sunday) Matthew 28:1-10
Tues Jesus Appears to the Disciples Luke 24:13-49
Wed Jesus Appears to Thomas John 20:19-29
Thur The Restoration of Peter John 21:1-19
Fri The Great Commission Matthew 28:16-20
Sat Jesus Ascends to Heaven Acts 1:1-11

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Discovering Jesus, a Bible Reading Plan for Beginners
© 2019 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
You are welcome to use this work with proper attribution. Please leave a comment for information and permission to publish this work in any form.

Get in the Game- Reading God’s Word for Yourself

football players in blue jersey lined under grey white cloudy sky during sunset

Photo by Binyamin Mellish on Pexels.com

It’s time for the big game. How are you going to experience it? Are you going to…

  • Skip it and read about it the next day online?
  • Have someone tell you about it?
  • Watch it on TV?
  • Purchase tickets so you can watch it live from the stands?

What would it be like to actually suit up and get in the game?

How we engage the big game can be a metaphor for our life. Are we going to sit on the sidelines or watch it from afar or step out on the field and engage?

I’ll be honest. The idea of suiting up for a football game is absolutely terrifying to me. I am a wee little person and not in the best of shape.

Then it hits me. How many times have I said that about engaging life itself?

  • I’m not built to do that.
  • I’m not a professional.
  • I’m not trained. I don’t know what I’m doing.
  • I’m too old. I’m too young. I’m too frail. I’m too busy…
  • I don’t want to risk embarrassing myself.
  • I don’t want to hurt the efforts of the team.

The one that usually pops into my mind is, “I don’t want to get hurt.” Engagement goes hand in hand with risk.

We can sit on the sidelines of life. We can also sit on the sidelines of engaging God.

It’s easy to pick a devotional and read it, listen to a podcast, or say “Amen,” at the end of someone’s prayer. It’s easy to watch the preacher preaching, the teacher teaching, the worship musicians singing and playing their instruments for the glory of God. Thanks to online streaming, we don’t even have to change out of our PJ’s.

At their best, these beloved Christian practices draw us into the presence of God. Yet, so often, we are merely observing someone else’s encounter with God. We’re on the sidelines.

There’s nothing which can replace our own encounter with God.

As the old saying goes, “God doesn’t have grandchildren.” Our faith, our engagement must be our own.

You know this. It’s one thing to watch a couple marry. It’s another to be the bride or the groom.

The beauty of this life is encountering God ourselves. The miracle of it all is the Creator of the Universe, our Lord and Savior, wanting us and wanting us in the game.

There are so many ways this can happen. One of the primary ways is through reading the Word of God for yourself.  

There were years and years and years in my own Christian walk where I faithfully read devotion books. Devotion books are great. You read an inspiring testimony. You learn something new. But, they’re someone else’s encounter with God and God’s Word. They’re the view from the sidelines.

My faith changed radically when I started engaging the Word of God for myself. When I suited up and stepped onto the field and sought an encounter with God.

What do you need to read God’s Word for Yourself?

1. You need a plan. Click here for my post on the best Bible reading plan.

2. You need a designated place and time to read. Set an appointment with yourself and God and keep it.

3. You need a Bible Buddy, someone who is also reading the Scriptures. There’s a reason why Weight Watchers and AA works. Never underestimate the power of support and accountability.

4. Discover which type of engagement best works for you- listening to the scripture via an audio Bible, highlighting passages as you read, memorizing scripture, doodling or creating art based on what you read, etc.

I’m a writer, so journaling helps me engage God through God’s Word. My favorite Bible Journaling pattern is SOAP. The SOAP Method for keeping a spiritual journal is practiced by thousands of Christians. It was developed by Wayne Cordeiro, pastor New Hope Christian Fellowship in Hawaii.

S = Scripture
Read the Bible passage for the day. Copy the verse which catches your attention word for word into your journal.

O = Observation

  • What does this passage tell us about God?
  • Our world?
  • Ourselves?

A = Application
How will your life be different today because of what you have read?

  • Lessons to be learned
  • Examples to be followed or avoided
  • Promises to be claimed and enjoyed
  • A character trait of God revealed
  • Deeds to start, continue, or stop

P = Prayer
Include themes from your reading in your prayer time. I like to pray a keyword or theme from the passage over my prayer list. I keep my prayer list in the back of my journal.

I’d love to hear how you’re getting in the game. Leave a comment to encourage and inspire others. – Lisa <><

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Get in the Game- Reading God’s Word for Yourself © 2019 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
You are welcome to use this work in a worship setting with proper attribution. Please leave a comment for information and permission to publish this work in any form.

 

Why This Plan is the Best Bible Reading Plan

I’ve spent years looking for the perfect Bible reading plan.

  1. Not too much reading per day, not too little
  2. Easy enough for a beginner, challenging enough for a seasoned saint
  3. Five days per week so you can catch up if you miss a day or two.

The search did not bear fruit; it only delayed me reading the Bible at all. (Excellence is a virtue. Perfectionism is its evil, twisted shadow-side.)

Here’s the truth- There is no perfect reading plan.

The important thing is to just read, to intentionally and regularly seek God through God’s Word.

It’s essential. This is how we learn what God’s voice sounds like, who God is, who we are, and what God desires for us. This is how we hear God speak into our lives day after day after day.

So, let’s get reading. 

If you have a favorite Bible Reading Plan great! Use it!

If not, consider using my favorite plan – the 5 Day Bible Reading Plan by the good folks at Lower Lights Publications.

Here’s why I think it’s the best.
1. It’s free.

2. They update the reading schedule dates for each new year, but the reading plan itself stays the same.

3. It’s easy to print and slip it into your Bible or journal. (8.5 X 11, folded in half) You could even paste it into planner or hole-punch it for your planner.

4. There are boxes to check next to each day’s reading assignment and each week’s assignment. (a built-in habit tracker)

5. You can start anytime during the year.

6. It’s designed with grace. 5 reading days per week. There are days when I miss. If I use a 7 day a week plan I get behind and I get discouraged and I drop out.

7. It’s flexible. Do all the suggested readings and you’ll read through the entire Bible in a year. Or choose just the Old Testament readings or just the New Testament readings. Or choose the Old or New Testament plus the Psalms.

8. In this plan, you often read straight through an entire book of the Bible. There are some exceptions.

9. Big bonus- you read the Bible in chronological order rather than book order. This opens your eyes to the grand sweep of the Biblical narrative. It’s especially helpful to read the overlapping material in 1 2 Samuel, 1 2 Kings, and 1 2 Chronicles side by side. Plus, you will read one of the Gospels in each quarter of the year.

Well, there you have it, the best Bible reading plan I’ve found. I’d love to hear how it works for you.- Lisa <><

Bonus: Check out Steve Harper’s post entitled A Transforming Use of Scripture for insights on our motivation in approaching the Scriptures and the process God uses through Scripture to make us new.

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Why This Plan is the Best Bible Reading Plan © 2019 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
You are welcome to use this work in a worship setting with proper attribution. Please leave a comment for information and permission to publish this work in any form.

Ephesians Reading Challenge

Ephesians Challenge Graphic

Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to read and reflect on the entire book of Ephesians three times in three weeks.

The suggested pattern is one chapter per day, Monday through Saturday.
Rinse. Repeat.
Rinse. Repeat.

Here are some suggestions to help you with your reflection. Write or draw your answers on a piece of paper or in a journal.

1. Read the chapter for the day. Copy the word, phrase, or verse which catches your attention word for word.

2. What does this word, phrase, or verse reveal about God? Our world? Ourselves?

3. How will your life be different today because of what you have read?

4. What are your next steps in putting this into practice?

5. Speak with God about this. (a written or verbal prayer)

Or read the chapter and just sit with it. No striving for knowledge or answers. Being rather than doing. Listening. Resting. Jesus, I just want to be with you.

Feel free to share this challenge and/or leave a comment about what God reveals to you.
I look forward to hearing from you. – Lisa <><

PS- The Ephesians Challenge accompanies our new sermon series, Sit Walk Stand which beings Sunday, May 19th. You are most welcome to join us in person at 9am or 10:30am at Trinity Sarasota or online at 9am on our Facebook Page. I’ll also post the messages here.

Pursuing Peace- Messages, Reading Plan, Book Discussion

Sermon Series pursuing peace 1110 x 624

Depart from evil, and do good;
seek peace, and pursue it. – Psalm 34:14

As followers of Jesus Christ, we’re called to foster peace in the midst of evil, controversy, and conflict. Grow your understanding and skills in peacemaking through our upcoming Sunday messages, Bible reading plan, and book discussion sessions.

Sunday Messages
September 16
Cultivating a Heart of Peace
Matthew 5:43-47; Genesis 1:26-27

September 23
Recognizing a Heart of War
James 3:13-18; Luke 18:9-14; Matthew 6:1-6

September 30
Out of the Box
Mark 6:30-34; John 8:1-11

October 7
Helping Things Go Right
1 Samuel 24; Ephesians 4:1-6

Bible Reading Plan
How does this passage reveal the nature and will of God?
What is the big idea and why is it important?
Is there an example to follow or avoid?
Lord, help me apply the truth of this passage to my life today!

September 2-8

  • Genesis 1:26-27
  • Ezekiel 36:22-28
  • Matthew 5:43-48
  • 1 John 4:7-12
  • John 14:15-27
  • Micah 4:1-5

September 9-15

  • Galatians 5:13-26
  • James 3:13-18
  • James 4:1-10
  • Luke 18:9-14
  • Romans 12:1-5
  • Matthew 6:1-6

September 16-22

  • Mark 6:30-34
  • Matthew 5:1-16
  • Psalm 51
  • Romans 12:9-21
  • Mark 14:3-9
  • Matthew 7:1-5, 12

September 23-29

  • Luke 10:25-37
  • 1 Samuel 24
  • 2 Corinthians 5:16-21
  • John 8:1-11
  • Luke 15:11-32
  • Ephesians 4:1-6

book anatomy of peaceBook Discussion Sessions
Read The Anatomy of Peace: Resolving the Heart of Conflict by The Arbinger Institute. If you live in the Sarasota FL area, come to one or more of our book discussion sessions. If you live outside the area, consider forming a discussion group of your own.

Sunday, September 16 at 4:00 pm
Panera on Bee Ridge & Cattlemen

Thursday, September 20 at 9:00 am
Caribou Coffee & Einstein Bagels
Corner of Bee Ridge and Tamiami Trail

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Pursuing Peace © 2018 Lisa Ann Moss Degrenia
You are welcome to use these resources with proper attribution.
Please leave a comment for permission to publish this work in any form.

You Can Read the Bible: Three Approaches

South Sudan Bible Reading by Steve Evans via Wikimedia Commons

South Sudan Bible Reading by Steve Evans via Wikimedia Commons

I. You Can Read the Bible by Steve Harper
One of the biggest mistakes we have made with the Bible is leaving the impression that only scholars can correctly interpret it. Everything is made so layered, nuanced, and complex that many folks instantly feel they lack the “training” and “horsepower” to make it through all the mazes.

So, they either stop trying or they become passive and wait for the “experts” to tell them what’s “right.” But the fact is, the Bible is intended to be understandable! The original languages do contain levels of insight, but their essential meanings are accessible to us all.

Here is a way to make it so in your personal reading and in your conversations with others. Take a passage, read it, and ask:
(1) What is the big idea?
(2) Why is it important?
(3) Where does it presently connect with my life–or–why is it not a part of me?
(4) Should it be part of me? If so, how can I continue (or begin) to put it into practice?

Most Bible passages will “bear fruit” when these questions are applied to them, either in private or in a group. And when you add to your own inductive study the additional resources of concordances, dictionaries, maps, and commentaries, you will find the messages of scripture influencing your life day after day.

II. SOAP
The SOAP Method for keeping a spiritual journal is practiced by thousands of Christians. I first learned of it from Wayne Cordeiro, pastor New Hope Christian Fellowship in Hawaii. For more information on this simple and powerful way of engaging the Word of God, click here for the video on their website.

Here’s a brief summary of the process.
S = Scripture
Read the Bible passage for the day. Copy the verse which catches your attention word for word in your journal.

O = Observation
Write a brief description of what is going on in the passage you read.

A = Application
Write about how your life will be different today because of what you have read.
• Lessons to be learned
• Examples to be followed or avoided
• Promises to be claimed and enjoyed
• A character trait of God revealed

P = Prayer
Write out a prayer for yourself and others based on what you read today.

III. Lectio Divina explained by Whitney R. Simpson in his book Holy Listening with Breath, Body, and the Spirit
The words Lectio Divina are Latin for “holy reading.”

This ancient prayer practice includes the following steps:
lectio (“to read”)
meditatio (“to reflect”)
oratio (“to respond”)
and contemplatio (“to rest”).

Lectio Divina allows you to listen for God’s activity using scripture and to connect to God through the ancient Word while delving into a particular passage.

The practice of Lectio Divina focuses on formational reading of scripture, as opposed to informational reading. Formational reading invites the text to shape you, while informational reading invites you to understand the text. Though both types of reading can be useful on a spiritual journey, the art of Lectio Divina allows you to interact with God’s Word through meditating on a passage and listening for God’s leading.

My personal journey has been shaped by spending time in the Word using Lectio Divina. Through this practice, I have realized how scripture can speak to my life regardless of what I am facing. Lectio Divina has allowed me to see and hear God in new ways.

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So, let’s get reading. Here are three simple reading plans to get you started. Each will take you through the New Testament in one year. It’s especially helpful to start with the New Testament if you are new to Bible reading.

1. New Testament Reading Plan- Bible order
This plan will take you through the New Testament in the order in which it is printed in the Bible. Easy. Just read straight through.

2. New Testament Reading Plan- event order
This plan will take you through the New Testament in the order in which the events most likely happened. You’ll jump from chapter to chapter in different books in this plan. Is it scholarly perfect, no, but it is helpful for those of us who want a chronological approach to Jesus’ life and the lives of the first believers. (We aren’t getting caught in the perfectionism trap. If this sounds interesting, go for it.)

3. New Testament Reading Plan- mixed
This plan spreads the Gospel readings throughout the year with the other books mixed in between. Even though you skip around the New Testament in this plan, you will read a book at a time.

Click Here for more information on today’s featured image, South Sudan Bible Reading by Steve Evans

Advent and Christmas Bible Reading Plans

Live Hope, Give Hope: A Plan to Share the Goodness of Jesus at Christmas
Readings from Isaiah, Matthew, Luke, John, and Psalms
Also includes a sentence prayer and action prompts to Help, Offer, Pray, or Encourage
December 1-31, 6 days per week

Comfort and Joy: A Simple Bible Reading Plan for Christmas
Readings from Matthew, Luke and Johnbible luke 2
Some of the readings are even repeated so you can go slow and go deep. Also includes a sentence prayer for each reading.
December 1-31, 5 days per week

Jesus, the Coming Messiah- Advent Bible Readings from Old Testament to New
Old and New Testament Readings
December 1-25, everyday
This reading plan highlights the Old Testament names and prophesies concerning the Messiah which Christians see fulfilled in Jesus.

The Advent Door Reading Plan
Based on Jan Richardson’s book Through the Advent Door: Entering a Contemplative Christmas . Her book is structured in the style of a classic Advent calendar, with 25 scripture reflections, each with an original piece of art. This is a true Advent reading plan, with the first 18 readings focusing on the repentance and the 2nd coming of Christ.

Countdown to Christmas
Old and New Testament Readings
December 1-25, everyday