Book Shelf: Listening at Golgotha

Listening at Golgotha
Peter Storey (Author) with illustrations by Jan L. Richardson
Published by Upper Room (October 1, 2004)

My review: 5 out of 5 stars
Peter Storey has the rare ability to articulate a deep theological truth in ways that are easy to understand, yet inspiring, yet challenging. Every word has purpose and is carefully chosen, yet the outcome remains approachable and flowing. Themes of personal spiritual formation walk hand in hand with themes of social justice as it does in the Gospels. Jan Richardson’s illustrations are a perfect pairing- simple yet profound. This treasure of a book works especially well for Lenten reflections, one per week, or even Holy Week, one for each day.

From the publisher:
Last words are always significant. When the last words are spoken by Christ, they take on profound meaning for Christians and the church. Arguably, the last things Jesus said from the cross have to be the most important and life-altering words ever spoken. When you read the story of the crucifixion, you may focus on the most-quoted quotes – “Forgive them” and “Why have you forsaken me?” – and miss relevant lessons in the other things he said. On the surface, some utterances (“I’m thirsty” and “Woman, here’s your son”) may be seen as little more than dialogue or statements of fact. Author Peter Storey finds deep meaning in all of the last words of Jesus (even the sometimes overlooked ones) that can transform your life and your celebration of Lent and Easter.

The last utterances of Christ from the cross cast light on his saving work and invite us to engage in the depths of his suffering. A book of meditations for Holy Week, Listening at Golgotha confronts your need to receive (and act upon) the gift of his sacrifice in ways that will transform your life. These meditations were born from years spent in ministry under apartheid’s oppression in South Africa. “It’s often those most sinned against in our society who seem able to grasp the self-giving mystery of atonement,” writes Storey. “…If we believe that ‘Christ died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures, we each need to bring to Calvary the issues of sin and righteousness, both personal and systemic, that we wrestle with in our time and place.”

The words Jesus spoke from the cross have helped Christians to hear more clearly the saving word God spoke through the cross. Charcoal illustrations by Jan L. Richardson enhance each day’s meditation. Live the power of the Resurrection more fully by listening to the Seven Words in challenging new ways.

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